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Did you know that your allergies can harm your hearing?

GESUNDHEIT!

With the beautiful weather comes ALLERGY SEASON!

Did you know that your seasonal allergies can affect your hearing? Histamines can cause inflamed nasal passages – which causes excess mucus production, which in turn can cause a Eustachian tube dysfunction. This can create a conductive hearing loss. For some, this can create a blocked feeling or pressure in their ears. Then its time for a hearing test!

Treating your allergies should reduce these symptoms, but if you feel discomfort in your ears even while taking allergy medication you should see a doctor. The longer you live with the discomfort the more damage you are doing to the structures in your ear!

Allergies have you feeling like your ears are blocked or plugged? Schedule an appointment to see our Audiologist! (519) 961-9285

http://www.hearinglab.com/blog/tag/allergy-season/

Our Doctors of Audiology, Audiologists, Paige Pierozynski & Bernice McKenzie

What is an Audiologist?

Continuing with our post-per-day vow through the month of May for Better Hearing Month, we decided to tell you who and what we are! We’re Audiologists!

At The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic, we are happy to have two Doctors of Audiology, Audiologists – Paige Pierozynski & Bernice McKenzie – to help you with your hearing & balance needs.

An Audiologist is a healthcare practitioner with a special interest in your ears. Our expertise includes the prevention, identification, assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of auditory and balance disorders; and provide care to all age groups from infants to the elderly.

We like how this Audiologist explains the differences between practitioners that you may see about your ears or hearing and why you should choose an Audiologist.

If you or someone you know has a problem with their hearing, experiences tinnitus, vertigo or imbalance – we’d be glad to offer our services and experience to you. We are open Monday through Friday, and are independently and locally owned.

Please call (519) 961-9285 to schedule an appointment for your hearing or balance with our Audiologists!

 

Diabetics are twice as likely to have hearing loss

Diabetics – Schedule Your Annual Hearing Test Today

Happy Wednesday!

We all know there are many causes of hearing loss; exposure to loud noise, aging, head trauma, etc. What you may not associate with hearing loss is DIABETES. Studies show that people who are diabetic – even pre-diabetic, were twice as likely to have a hearing loss. Considering there are 2.4 million Canadians who have been diagnosed diabetic, a visit to our Doctors of Audiology at The Hearing & Dizziness Clinic for an annual hearing test is a must!

If you or someone you love suffers from Diabetes, call 519.961.9285 today to arrange your diagnostic hearing assessment.

The full article can be found here -> http://www.healthyhearing.com/report/52369-Diabetics-twice-as-likely-to-have-hearing-loss

Winter is Ear Infection Season!

Acute ear infections occur most often in the winter. You cannot catch an ear infection from someone else, but a cold may spread among children and cause some of them to get ear infections.

Risk factors for acute ear infections include:

  • Children Attending daycare
  • Changes in altitude or climate
  • Cold climate
  • Exposure to smoke
  • Genetic factors (susceptibility to infection may run in families)
  • Not being breastfed
  • Pacifier use
  • Recent or Previous ear infection
  • Recent illness of any type (lowers resistance of the body to infection)

We like these tips to help prevent ear infections, http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ear-infections/basics/prevention/con-20014260

See your Doctor if you are experiencing any pain in your ears for more than a day, if the pain is severe or if there is any discharge from the ears.

While its common to experience some mild hearing loss or a feeling of wearing ear plugs while the ear infection is active, once treated, the hearing should return to normal. Chronic ear infections can lead to permanent hearing loss. Its important to keep those ears healthy!

If you or your child experience recurrent ear infections, call our Doctors of Audiology to arrange a hearing test!

10 Signs YOU May Have Hearing Loss

Hello! We hope this entry finds you warm and well!

We got to talking about how Melissa’s Grandmother says she mumbles, and Paige’s Dad commonly mishears parts of a conversation.

The article below illustrates the 10 signs that you may have  a hearing loss. How many apply to you? To your loved ones? If YES was answered to any of these, then you should call us at (519) 961-9285 to schedule a comprehensive hearing assessment!

Click  here  for the article.

 

Hearing Aids May Improve Balance

Hearing Aids May Improve Balance
by Julia Evangelou Strait

Timothy Hullar, MD, (right) and medical student Miranda Colletta help patient Audrey Miller prepare for a balance test. Older adults with hearing loss appeared to perform better on balance tests with both hearing aids on, according to Hullar’s research. Credit: Robert Boston

Enhancing hearing appears to improve balance in older adults with hearing loss, according to new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Patients with hearing aids in both ears performed better on standard balance tests when their hearing aids were turned on compared with when they were off.

The small study, which appears in the journal The Laryngoscope, involved only 14 people ages 65 to 91 but is the first to demonstrate that sound information, separate from the balance system of the inner ear, contributes to maintaining the body’s stability. The study lends support to the idea that improving hearing through hearing aids or cochlear implants may help reduce the risk of falls in older people.

“We don’t think it’s just that wearing hearing aids makes the person more alert,” said senior author Timothy E. Hullar, MD, professor of otolaryngology at the School of Medicine. “The participants appeared to be using the sound information coming through their hearing aids as auditory reference points or landmarks to help maintain balance. It’s a bit like using your eyes to tell where you are in space. If we turn out the lights, people sway a little bit—more than they would if they could see. This study suggests that opening your ears also gives you information about balance.”
All participants served as their own controls, performing the balance tests with and without their hearing aids turned on. Since the researchers were interested in examining the effect of hearing, all tests were conducted in the presence of a sound source producing white noise, similar to the sound of radio static.
In one test, subjects’ eyes were covered as they stood with their feet together on a thick foam pad. In a second, more difficult task, patients stood on the floor with one foot in front of the other, heel to toe, also with no visual cues for balance. Patients were timed to see how long they could stand in these positions without moving their arms or feet, or requiring the aid of another person to maintain balance.
Several of the participants could maintain stability on the foam pad for at least 30 seconds (which is the considered normal), whether their hearing aids were on or not. But those having more difficulty with balance in this test performed better when their hearing aids were on. And the improvement in performance was even more apparent in the more challenging balance test.
“We wanted to see if we could detect an improvement even in people who did very well on the foam test,” Hullar said. “And we found, indeed, their balance improved during the harder test with their hearing aids on.”

For the foam pad test, patients maintained balance an average of 17 seconds with hearing aids off. With hearing aids on, this average increased to almost 26 seconds. And in the more difficult heel-to-toe test, patients remained stable an average of 5 seconds with hearing aids off. With them on, this time increased to an average of 10 seconds. Even with the small number of patients in the trial, both time differences were statistically significant.
Although patients could tell whether their hearing aids were on or off, the researchers randomized the order of the conditions in which each patient performed these tests, so that some performed the tests with hearing aids on first and some started with them off.
Hullar pointed out that many of the study patients did not report being consciously aware that they had performed better on these tests when their hearing aids were working. But he said he has heard anecdotal evidence that some people notice a difference.
“Many of my patients say their balance is better when they’re wearing hearing aids or cochlear implants,” Hullar said. “We wanted to find out if improved hearing really has a measurable effect on balance. And the metric that we use—how many seconds can you stand on a piece of foam—has a well-documented relationship to risk of falling.
“This is a small study,” Hullar added. “Obviously it needs to be repeated in a much larger study, and we’re seeking funding to do that.”

More information: “The effect of hearing aids on postural stability.” Laryngoscope. 2014 Oct 24. DOI: 10.1002/lary.24974. [Epub ahead of print]
Journal reference: Laryngoscope
Provided by Washington University in St. Louis